Wellbeing and SMSC

Children must be taught how to think, not what to think

Margaret Mead

At The Mulberry House School, we are committed to supporting children’s personal development and wellbeing.

In the Prep classes, our Mulberry Mindset continues to play a pivotal role in how we support the children’s development. Through curricular and extracurricular activities, we encourage a sense of achievement, self-worth, moral responsibility and mutual respect for others. Our Philosophy and Debating sessions develop a sense of spiritual understanding and encourage the children to develop their critical thinking skills and acceptance of others points of view. In order to support the children’s wellbeing, we offer daily yoga and mindfulness sessions both in and outside of the classroom.

The children are supported in developing a growth mindset and apply this to all challenges they face. Their efforts are awarded each week in assembly where certificates are given out by the Headteacher.

We support the children’s wellbeing through initiatives such as our worry box, the friend stop, our Kindness Council and at regular story times where we introduce the NSPCC’s pants rule and speak about online safety.

Diversity is thinking independently together

- Malcom Forbes

Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education (SMSC)

What is Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Education?

Spiritual, moral, social and cultural education (SMSC) is not taught as a discreet subject in itself but rather it pervades all aspects of learning at The Mulberry House School. SMSC aims to ensure that our children learn to develop attitudes and beliefs that will make them well-rounded, tolerant, respectful, open-minded and informed future citizens.

From the definitions of each aspect of SMSC below, it is possible to see how each can easily be combined with our curriculum so that our aims can be achieved.

Spiritual education

  • Explore beliefs and experience; respect faiths, feelings and values; enjoy learning about oneself, others and the surrounding world; use imagination and creativity; reflect.

Moral education

  • Recognise right and wrong; respect the law; understand consequences; investigate moral and ethical issues; offer reasoned views and have an appreciation of British Values.

Social education

  • Investigate moral issues; appreciate diverse viewpoints; participate, volunteer and cooperate; resolve conflict; engage with the fundamental British value of democracy.

Cultural education

  • Appreciate cultural influences; appreciate the role of Britain’s parliamentary system; participate in culture opportunities; understand, accept, respect and celebrate diversity.